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Zimbabwean University Partners With Web3 Hub to Host Its First-Ever Blockchain Hackathon


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Zimbabwean University Partners With Web3 Hub to Host Its First-Ever Blockchain Hackathon

On Dec. 8 and 9, the University of Zimbabwe in partnership with the South Africa-based Mzansi Web3 Hub, held the learning institution’s inaugural blockchain hackathon. Taurayi Rupere, the chairman of the institution’s computer science department, said the hackathon’s goal is to produce “open-minded” developers who “think outside the box.”

Overwhelming Interest in the Hackathon

The University of Zimbabwe (UZ) recently partnered with South Africa-based Mzansi Web3 to hold the learning institution’s first hackathon. About 175 students from different faculties and stages of their courses registered to participate in the Dec. 8 and 9 hackathon.

Taurayi Rupere, the chairman of the institution’s computer science department, told Bitcoin.com News that the hackathon’s goal is to produce “open-minded” developers who “think outside the box.” While organizers of the two-day event were initially targeting students from the computer science faculty, Rupere said the excitement sparked by the hackathon eventually forced his department to extend the invitation to students from other fields.

During an interview, the UZ’s computer science department chairman discussed some steps that the university can take to help both students and non-students learn more about blockchain technology.

“We need to run a course to conscientize the market itself, we need to do this for two or three months. We can also do this via the research projects that our students do,” Rupere said.

He added that both the UZ and students are hopeful that the hackathon is not going to be a one-off event but the first of many more to come.

Enhancing Younger Generations’ Understanding and Skills

Shaheer Karrim, the founder of Mzansi Web3 Hub, told Bitcoin.com News that he is hopeful the educational initiatives his organization is currently undertaking in Southern Africa “will enhance the younger generations’ understanding and skills in blockchain technology.” They will also enhance “Africa’s active participation in the global digital revolution.”

Karrim also spoke of the ongoing role of the Internet Computer Protocol (ICP) in making blockchain technology popular not just in Southern Africa but across the continent. He said:

“The rise in blockchain technology adoption by African governments and corporates indicates a recognition of its potential to revolutionise various sectors. The Internet Computer Protocol, known for its advanced technological stack, is becoming increasingly popular worldwide.”

According to Karrim, teaching the continent’s future generations about blockchain technologies will ensure that African countries’ youth are well-prepared to benefit from “the impending digital revolution.” Confidence Nyirenda, the lead ambassador of Mzansi Web3 Hub in Zimbabwe, said the purpose of this and upcoming hackathons is to introduce the Internet Computer Protocol (ICP) to students.

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